HackMotion Wrist Sensor

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The HackMotion Sensor provides the best training tool to learn the correct wrist mechanics for both improved ball flight with your full swing motion, your short game and putting strokes. Precise data and feedback provide an opportunity to accelerate the learning process.

Regardless of the stroke being played the clubface determines more than 80% of the direction of your ball flight and your wrist angles directly determine how the clubface moves. By controlling the wrist angles we can control the clubface. Your lead wrist (left wrist for RH players) controls what the clubface does. The greater control a player has on the amount of flexion/extension of the wrist, the better he/she will control the clubface and the ball flight.

HackMotion provides auditory feedback so that you will know precisely what you need to do to maximize your wrist position. You are able to set a range of motion that facilitates learning through motion. The biofeedback maximizes your progress while training.

The putting strokes of tour professionals limit the range of wrist movement

The large database of recorded putting strokes by HackMotion clearly show that tour players are limiting the range of wrist motion during putting stroke and they are very consistent at repeating it. Amateurs on the other hand typically move their lead wrist joint a lot and have a lot of variation between any two putting strokes which leads to inconsistent results.

This trend is obvious once you start using the HackMotion Wrist sensor. The sensor measures all aspects of wrist motion during a putting stroke – flexion/extension (bowing/cupping), radial/ulnar deviation (hinging/unhinging), global rotation and tempo. 

Take a look at these 2 graphs to see how HackMotion data looks like for putting strokes. The image on the left shows a poor putting stroke. Notice the amplitude and spread of the lines. The green line represents flexion/extension (bowing/cupping) which changes by 15 degrees. That’s a lot. On the image on the right we see a Tour player’s putting stroke where address and impact readings are almost identical indicating that the wrist joint is very steady.